The Gardens of Villa Cimbrone

villa cimbrone

I wish that after every I hike I did, I could come back and relax at a villa as gorgeous as Villa Cimbrone. I could dine al fresco, sunbathe, walk around the gardens barefoot as I look out at the ocean. While that’s not my day-to-day reality, I’m so glad I toured the gardens of Villa Cimbrone in Ravello if only for a couple hours.

Once we arrived to the hilltop town of Ravello after our morning hike, my tour group had some time to explore and eat lunch before driving back to our agriturismo in Furore. Our guide Elisabetta highly recommended we visit Villa Cimbrone and I’m glad we took her advice. It was a 10-minute walk to the villa and the paved path curved along the edge of the town overlooking the waters of the Amalfi Coast.

villa cimbrone

Villa Cimbrone was owned by a couple Italian families and then abandoned for a while until it was purchased by an Englishman named Ernest William Beckett in the early 1900s. He wanted to renovate the entire estate and bring it back to its former glory. It was a passion project for him and a way to cure his depression over the passing of his beloved wife.

Once you enter the gardens, you can use a paper guide that explains the significance of each statue or area of the garden that you come across. Beckett did this place justice. It’s a beautiful oasis perched high above the hills.

villa cimbrone
The cloister, a little courtyard to your left as you enter the villa

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone
The crypt
villa cimbrone
The aptly titled Avenue of Immensity which leads to a breathtaking view
villa cimbrone
The Statue of Ceres, the goddess of Harvests, which stands at the end of the Avenue of Immensity

villa cimbrone

 

villa cimbrone
Once you pass the Statue of Ceres, you come to the Terrace of Infinity. Read carefully: This terrace is necessary. It’s probably the most beautiful terrace I’ve ever seen with a view that could never get old. So let’s just look at a few more pictures of said terrace, shall we?

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone
Mercury’s Seat, a statue and spot in the villa meant to inspire relaxation. An inscription on the statue reads: “Lost to the world of which I desire no part, I sit alone and speak to my heart, satisfied with my little corner of the world, content to feel no more sadness for death.”

villa cimbrone

villa cimbrone
The Temple of Bacchus is further along down the same dirt path as Mercury’s Seat. Lord Grimthorpe had his ashes scattered at the pedestal of this temple because he believed it was where his memory could be preserved
villa cimbrone
Here in Eve’s Grotto, the sculptor Adamo Tadolini gave Eve a surprised face at being caught naked
villa cimbrone
The Statue of David
villa cimbrone
It was too early in April for flowers to bloom, but the Rose Terrace was still beautiful
villa cimbrone
How amazing would it be to stay at the hotel?!

If you’re spending some time in Ravello, you should definitely make time to visit Villa Cimbrone. It’s such a peaceful and beautiful place to walk through and explore. It’s open 7 days a week and the entrance fee is 7 euros. And if you happen to stay at the hotel, please tell me so I can live vicariously through you!

*I paid for my own way on the “Local Living Italy – Amalfi Coast” tour with G Adventures and all thoughts and opinions are my own. 

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